David C Ayre

Author

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About the Author

David C. Ayre was trained as an electronics engineer at Loughborough University and has worked in the electronic field most of his life, later concentrating more on software. He was born in Hertfordshire but has lived in North Yorkshire for the last forty-seven years where he enjoys walking in the wilder parts of the county as well as the Lake District with his wife, Muriel. He has a son and a daughter and two step-daughters, four grandchildren and one step-grandson. He is also very keen on painting and drawing and has been very involved with amateur theatre for many years. He has written several books for teenagers as well as several pantomimes and screen plays.

He started writing stories when he was at school, most of them were science fiction and, probably, very bad. When his children were born he would tell them a bedtime story, each night, off the top of his head, featuring two elf-like characters, and his daughter also featured in each story. He painted a mural of one of the scenes on her bedroom wall - probably worth a fortune now if anyone were to rescue it from years of over painting.

 More recently, he had been writing a series of novels for teens but which might be enjoyed by adults, when he was rushed into hospital with a perforated duodenal ulcer. It was touch and go for a bit but it gave him the impetus to do something about getting his books published.

Since then, he has written a novel based on his own family tree - there were many questions to be answered, so he thought it would make a good story to try and fill in the gaps and explain the anomalies.

This was followed by ‘The Doomsday Machine’ which was launched at the end of August 2018 by Pegasus.

He has written the second book in the series (Where There’s Life…) which is now available from shops or online, and is busy, at the moment, writing the third book (Monkey Puzzle) and has plans to write further books featuring Alan Westbrook, the main character.